Why go to the art fairs?

There is a very good reason to visit the art fairs and the Armory Show in particular. I recently read an article written by an art dealer that basically said, artists are not welcome at fairs and should stay away. I couldn’t disagree more. There is a decorum that will benefit you, and it amounts to this. Do not even think about promoting your own work. If you follow that one rule, many of the dealers are willing to answer questions about the work shown and tend to be friendly.

 

The reason to go whether you’re an artist or not is this. There will be work, museum quality work for you to view and enjoy. The particular thing is, many of these works will be sold, and disappear. They’ll go into private collections and never see the light of day in public again. Oh, some will be eventually donated to museums and public collections but many will be gone for you or I to ever see again. This is a fact that doesn’t really have to do with how big your bank account is either. These are historical works that you have this one chance to see. Even the richest of us out there can’t buy everything. This was especially so on Pier 92 where the modern section was and will likely be next year. It’s a kind of pop up museum that will be there just for the weekend. So if you didn’t go this year and it’s within your reach, I recommend going next year.

 

Of course there are lots of fairs, with many good works there too. We here at AO try to promote living artists. The artists who had representation at the fairs, they’re getting good attention, and many are well deserving. Again, seeing the younger fairs is in many ways more interesting and highly recommended. Just this once, we’re going to do a rundown of a few and really just a few pieces of art history that were in the main fair this weekend. Works we may never get to stand if front of again.

 

JOSEF ALBERS Homage to the Square, 1970  Oil on masonite 31 1:2 × 31 1:2 in 80 × 80 cm
JOSEF ALBERS Homage to the Square, 1970 Oil on masonite 31 1:2 × 31 1:2 in 80 × 80 cm

 

MAX BECKMANN NACKTTANZ, 1922  Lithograph 26 3:5 × 21 in 67.6 × 53.3 cm
MAX BECKMANN NACKTTANZ, 1922 Lithograph 26 3:5 × 21 in 67.6 × 53.3 cm

 

 HELEN FRANKENTHALER Untitled, 1977 Acrylic on canvas 19 3/4 × 54 1/2 in 50.2 × 138.4 cm

HELEN FRANKENTHALER
Untitled, 1977
Acrylic on canvas
19 3/4 × 54 1/2 in
50.2 × 138.4 cm

 

Lucio Fontana Concetto spaziale, Attesa, 1966
Lucio Fontana Concetto spaziale, Attesa, 1966

 

RICHARD POUSETTE-DART Small Dark Room, 1943  Oil on linen
RICHARD POUSETTE-DART Small Dark Room, 1943 Oil on linen

 

OTTO DIX Die Schwangere, 1931  Oil on canvas 32 5:8 × 24 3:8 in 82.9 × 61.9 cm
OTTO DIX Die Schwangere, 1931 Oil on canvas 32 5:8 × 24 3:8 in 82.9 × 61.9 cm

 

MILTON RESNICK Cargo, 1957  Oil on canvas 47 3:4 × 47 3:4 in 121.3 × 121.3 cm
MILTON RESNICK Cargo, 1957 Oil on canvas 47 3:4 × 47 3:4 in 121.3 × 121.3 cm

 

AGNES MARTIN Untitled, 1978  Watercolor and pencil on rice paper 11 × 11 in 27.9 × 27.9 cm
AGNES MARTIN Untitled, 1978 Watercolor and pencil on rice paper 11 × 11 in 27.9 × 27.9 cm

 

ALFRED LESLIE Ornette Coleman, 1956  Oil on canvas 84 × 108 in 213.4 × 274.3 cm
ALFRED LESLIE Ornette Coleman, 1956 Oil on canvas 84 × 108 in 213.4 × 274.3 cm

 

JAMES BROOKS Y, 1952  Oil on canvas 23 1:4 × 18 1:4 in 59.1 × 46.4 cm
JAMES BROOKS Y, 1952 Oil on canvas 23 1:4 × 18 1:4 in 59.1 × 46.4 cm

 

LOUISE BOURGEOIS House Struck by a Lightning Bolt, 1998 Ink and graphite on paper 12 × 9 in 30.5 × 22.9 cm
LOUISE BOURGEOIS
House Struck by a Lightning Bolt, 1998
Ink and graphite on paper
12 × 9 in
30.5 × 22.9 cm

 

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